wake up & live from planet earth



Cultivare, cultiva terra, arable land, colere, colō; worship, protect, cultivate.

Live From Planet Earth extends a special unlimited invitation to our family's small estate in Jamaica for our $2400+/biennium members. Sign up by clicking your membership contribution amount below.




Enjoy: 1. Nature Immersion Therapy & Africana Study Abroad (regenerative & sustainable permaculture gardening: organic fertilizer production/worm composting/seed saving/germination/eco-friendly pest & disease management/multi- & inter-cropping, swimming/breathing/stretching/walking/running meditation, & book/music/media study group); 2. Vegetarian/Vegan/Plant-Based Nutrition (complimentary menu of fruits, roots, seeds, herbs, & vegetables); & 3. Wellness/Skin Therapy (complimentary facial care, consultation, techniques, & nutrition/exercise study: see below). (become a contributing member at any lesser amount & you'll have our deepest gratitude for your support; if you're a friend wanting to reach out, feel free to use our personal emails to send us support through the Zelle/Quickpay feature in your banking app or CashApp $lvfrmplnt3).

//info at livefromplanetearth.org
//youtube.com/livefromplanetearth

Testimonials:
"It was wonderful! Even more than we expected. Greatly appreciated!"
(Brandon)

"I didn't realize heaven was gonna look like this."
(Janice)

Live From Planet Earth is a hands-on, cooperative meditation — on self-sustaining, tropical, organic human being and development — rooting and producing through your generous, reparative, faithful contributions. Please support by helping us fill this measure little by little, slowly but surely: Biennial ($2400); Monthly ($5), ($10), ($25), ($30), ($40), ($60), ($70), ($80), ($90), ($130), ($200), ($300), ($500), ($1000).




wellness/skin therapy ...



... eternal spring. As a regular gift to our $10+/month members Live From Planet Earth offers traveling & video wellness/facial skin care consultation, techniques, & nutrition/exercise study led by our licensed esthetician Madeline Lafontant, who will assist you in building your personal care regimen with natural extracts/active-ingredient botanicals & a skin-analysis plan for long-term skin barrier stabilization. Let us create/maintain a healthy sense of self, practicing essential wellness rituals as old as humanity herself. Sign up by reviewing & choosing your desired membership below.

//wellness at livefromplanetearth.org

$10+/month
Video Consultation & Nutrition/Exercise Study
30 mins private Q&A: Youtube, Skype, Whatsapp, Facetime

$270+/month
Skin analysis, Massage, Maintenance, Extractions, Aromatherapy, Hydrotherapy, Detoxification, Hydration, &/ High Frequency
60-90 mins in Jamaica (partial airfare reimbursement), &/or at your home, job, events, &c.

Testimonials:
"I've worked with her for 5 years & I continue to be grateful for her care & attention. When we first met, she treated my skin, & over the years we've come to think about skincare more holistically & center the conversation around what is in my body, what I consume, & what is around my body (stress, &c.) & fold that all into a plan about how to not only care for my skin, but also my self. I can't recommend her enough!"
(Naima)

"So informative in explaining every single step she's doing with my skin. I'm glad I finally met someone who was really willing to help and boost my natural skin barrier function, instead of focusing on giving that instant glow without really thinking about sustainable skin health."
(Lydia)

"Not only extremely knowledgeable and attentive, but also she was ridiculously charismatic. My skin spoke to her, and she listened. Everything she applied to my face was explained thoroughly, and I never felt my face wasn’t in good hands. My skin was restored to a healthy glow, better than some longer facials I’ve had before. She helped me understand what type of post-facial care I needed for my problem areas."
(Doreen)

"You are seriously the skin whisperer. It’s insane how much of an improvement I see."
(Sandra)

Live From Planet Earth is a hands-on, cooperative meditation — on self-sustaining, tropical, organic human being and development — rooting and producing through your generous, reparative, faithful contributions. Please support by helping us fill this measure little by little, slowly but surely: Biennial ($2400); Monthly ($10), ($270), ($280), ($290), ($300), ($320), ($400), ($420), ($500), ($520), ($1000).





breaking (the) media

𓆃 "Taraji P. Henson: Your strength is in your vulnerability. Healing, emotional trust, Earth grounding, therapy, & more"

𓆃 "Moringa Tree: 25 Health Benefits"

𓆃 "How To Use Up To 90% Less Water In Your Garden?"

𓆃 "Liquid Fertilizers: How to Make Them"

𓆃 "Reforestation Of The Sacred Mountain"

𓆃 "Farmers seize Mexico dam in protest of water payments to the U.S."

𓆃 "The Rainmaker: Clothing the Naked Mountain"

𓆃 "Spillage Village – Mecca"

𓆃 "timeline of Frederick Douglass & family"

𓆃 "100-year-old Myanmar woman beats coronavirus "

𓆃 "Dr. Greg Carr advises Ice Cube to form Political Action Committee"

𓆃 "Protoje - In Bloom f. Lila Iké"

𓆃 "youtube/livefromplanetearth"

𓆃 "being able to actively converse with survivors after they're gone . . . in the age of artificial intelligence"

𓆃 "join us & live from planet earth"

𓆃 "kale harvest"

𓆃 "aloe planting"

𓆃 "avocado harvest"

𓆃 "comfrey harvest"

𓆃 "basil harvest"

𓆃 "Africana Study Abroad"

𓆃 "The Last Generation of Black People"

𓆃 "The Liberator Magazine"

𓆃 "polygyny/polyfidelity: realistic solution to oppression & disunity?"

𓆃 "Kale Companion Planting Guide: 7 Plants to Pair With Kale"

𓆃 "Interoception"

𓆃 "healing yoga poses for most common pains & opening energy chakras"

𓆃 "How Many Bowel Movements Should You Have Every Day?"

𓆃 "A 3D Atlas of the Universe"

𓆃 "How Earth Moves"

𓆃 "Dual Nationality"

𓆃 "Making Garden Compost From Wastes, Principles & Results"

𓆃 "All About Weeds"

𓆃 "The Helical Model Pt.1, Our Solar System is a Vortex"

𓆃 "The Helical Model Pt. 2, Our Galaxy is a Vortex"

𓆃 "2Pac's Mom Afeni Shakur Gives Amazing Speech"

𓆃 "The Forested Garden: What is a Food Forest?"

(●●●)




aloe planting



Live From Planet Earth is a hands-on, cooperative meditation — on self-sustaining, tropical, organic human being and development — rooting and producing through your generous, reparative, faithful contributions. Please support by helping us fill this measure little by little, slowly but surely: Biennial ($2400); Annual ($36), ($180), ($2400), ($6000); Monthly ($3), ($5), ($10), ($15), ($25), ($30), ($40), ($60), ($70), ($80), ($90), ($130), ($200), ($500), ($1000).

//youtube.com/livefromplanetearth




avocado harvest



Live From Planet Earth is a hands-on, cooperative meditation — on self-sustaining, tropical, organic human being and development — rooting and producing through your generous, reparative, faithful contributions. Please support by helping us fill this measure little by little, slowly but surely: Biennial ($2400); Annual ($36), ($180), ($2400), ($6000); Monthly ($3), ($5), ($10), ($15), ($25), ($30), ($40), ($60), ($70), ($80), ($90), ($130), ($200), ($500), ($1000).

//youtube.com/livefromplanetearth




polygyny/polyfidelity: realistic solution to oppression & disunity?


(Above: PolyPatterson3 YOUTUBE)

In the following email about polygamy/polygyny/polyfidelity, a reader, sharing her thoughts after an individual study on the subject, wonders if a modified or resurrected, egalitarian version of the practice might be an immediate solution to and defense against persistent forms of politico-economic oppression such as greed.

She specifically mentioned an example where perhaps a father has children with different women yet those women choose to get along and foster and cultivate their relationships with each other for the purpose of making sure the children feel at home even when they are with their "step" mothers. In fact, I'm sure this type of thing happens pretty regularly already. Why is society negatively obsessed with the imagined pleasure of multiple-peopled long-term intimate relationships if parenting or fostering land is the shared primary purpose?


(Above: Triadsolit - Polyamory Relationships vs. Monogamy Relationships YOUTUBE)

I would assume the reverse of this would also be something to consider, although the majority of these type of multi-parent situations that I know of involve woman sharing a common link to one man. But given the incarceration rates (or unjust incarceration laws) affecting black men, this is no surprise.

Like she suggests, the practice must be shielded by a sub-culture bubble from the mainstream norms. As a matter of fact, Africana diaspora nations may offer more fertile soil. But the fundamental concept is sound--multiple parents who share a common father or mother spouse making those ties of accountability stronger to each other. Classicists of all cultural stripes point out that bisexual polygyny was an ancient norm to foster and reify permanent inter-generational collaboration, interdependence, and harmony among familial codependents. The internet is full of loving examples of poly triads, throuples, threesome relationships, &c. As long as there is some sort of serious classic cultural understanding and appreciation taking place, alongside relentless communication and emotional therapy, these relationships should thrive.


(Above: Yanna Talk On Polygamy YOUTUBE)

And maybe the women wouldn't all want to get married to a brother, but perhaps they might define for themselves a higher definition or title for their mutual relationship than "baby mamas/daddys" as to hold each other accountable for each other's and the collective responsibilities; belonging to the shared family unit collectively. What's needed isn't matriarchy or patriarchy; every child knows it doesn't want to be patronized or matronized, just balanced in tune with the cradle.


(Above: Rise Family: Come enjoy the vibes! YOUTUBE)

Here's what she had to say:

"I stumbled upon a blog last week about Polygamy, its African and biblical origins, and as a possible alternative for single-parent homes so prevalent today, and the black family in western culture. Reading what everyone had to say was really interesting and got me thinking a lot deeper on the subject. Perhaps a modified version could be the cure for the destruction. At first when I read it I was like, 'hell nah that's some crazy cult mess,' then I thought about my current situation.


(Above: The Trifecta Love - A Peek Into Polyamory, Who Gets the Middle?! YOUTUBE)

"Neither of us are "married" to him but the three of us are bonded as a parental unit and have the common goal of love, nurturing, and growing. Which in theory loosely resembles a polygamist or closed polyamorist union.

"The basic idea of it can't be ignored as we all strive to regain and redefine the 'village' culture in western society. I think it would be interesting for The Liberator readers."

(●●●)




comfrey harvest



Live From Planet Earth is a hands-on, cooperative meditation — on self-sustaining, tropical, organic human being and development — rooting and producing through your generous, reparative, faithful contributions. Please support by helping us fill this measure little by little, slowly but surely: Biennial ($2400); Annual ($36), ($180), ($2400), ($6000); Monthly ($3), ($5), ($10), ($15), ($25), ($30), ($40), ($60), ($70), ($80), ($90), ($130), ($200), ($500), ($1000).

//youtube.com/livefromplanetearth




basil harvest



Live From Planet Earth is a hands-on, cooperative meditation — on self-sustaining, tropical, organic human being and development — rooting and producing through your generous, reparative, faithful contributions. Please support by helping us fill this measure little by little, slowly but surely: Biennial ($2400); Annual ($36), ($180), ($2400), ($6000); Monthly ($3), ($5), ($10), ($15), ($25), ($30), ($40), ($60), ($70), ($80), ($90), ($130), ($200), ($500), ($1000).

//youtube.com/livefromplanetearth




the last generation of black people





2012, New York: The Liberator Magazine.
ISBN 9780991108404
» Artbook @ Museum of Modern Art PS1
» McNally Jackson
» The Strand
» Quimby's
» Ancestry Books
» PanAfrican Connection

Testimonials:
"Gorgeous."
(Amber)

"Brilliant."
(Joe)

"On a level nobody else is on... nothing like this exists elsewhere."
(Karega)


Table Of Contents:
» Editor's Note
(by Brian Hughes Kasoro / Minneapolis, MN:USA)

» For the Sake of Sanity
(by Stephanie Joy Tisdale / Philadelphia, PA:USA)

» Realities We Otherwise Would Never Know: The Art Of Relating Beyond Ideology
(by Brian Hughes Kasoro / Brooklyn, NY:USA)

» On Aesthetic Reasoning In Africana Studies
(by Josh Myers / Philadelphia, PA:USA)

» The Case of Hip-Hop
(by Michael J. Wilson / Brooklyn, NY:USA)

» Outsider Music: Willis Earl Beal and the Real Blues
(by Brian Kupillas / Fayatteville, AR:USA)

» I'm in the Band
(by Nira Minniefield / Houston, TX:USA)

» Nat Turner: God's Instrument of Vengeance
(by Vagabond Beaumont / New Rochelle, NY:USA)

» Reflections on African (American) Adulthood in an Object Permanence Culture
(by Adisa Ajamu / Long Beach, CA:USA)

» The Children of Injustice (book excerpt)
(by Ruth Auguste / Vancouver: Canada)

» (art) Rap Music and Gold Teeth
(by Fletcher Williams / New York, NY:USA)

» The Percussive Approach
(by Sherese Francis / Hollis, NY:USA)

» The Last Mask: An Ekphrasis of Papua's Masquerade Kamoro
(by Mia R. Keeys / Jakarta: Indonesia)

» "Dude, you're the Whitest Black man I've ever met."
(by Khaya Maseko / Johannesburg: South Africa)

» The Rise and Inevitable Liberation of the Black Creative Class
(by Robert Bland / Hyattsville, MD:USA)

» Beautyful Radiant Things
(by Taryn Jeanie Mackay / Johannesburg: South Africa)

» Notes from the Nobodies
(by Jessica Porter and Jeanette E. Toomer / Brooklyn, NY:USA)

» A Prince Remembers A King Named Oliver In Exile
(by Shawn Chandler Bingham / Tampa, FL:USA)

» Speaking Truth to Perceived Power
(by Vanessa May / Los Angeles, CA:USA)

» I Bet You Thought Her Life Was About You (Ms. Lauryn Hill)
(by Krystal Nylle Roberts / Atlanta, GA:USA)

» Heathen Songs of the Natives
(by Charles Nhamo Rupare / Johannesburg, South Africa)

» Afro-America at the Crossroads: Ritual Ethnogenesis
(by Shayla Monroe / Memphis, TN:USA)


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
CONTACT: scripts at liberatormagazine.com

The Last Generation of Black People

The opening words of The Liberator Magazine’s first book release fittingly belong to historian Dr. John Henrik Clarke: “A people’s name should link them to land, history, and culture. ‘Black’ tells you how you look, but not who you are.”

So begins The Last Generation of Black People (The Liberator Magazine, 2012) — a biographic, ethnographic compilation of critical research in consciousness and culture that marks more than a decade of independent print journal publishing. The theme and namesake were born out of a recognition that a mutation had occurred; from the multi-generational experiences bracketed by post-slavery reconstruction and the crack epidemic of the 80s, into fully-commercialized notions of “Blackness.” At this pivotal juncture, the generation of the post-crack era could either go the way of an historically-amnesic Blackness or embrace the potential for a generational rebirth and time-signature realignment with African land, history, and culture.

“In order to proceed confidently with the work of remaking lost connections in our collective consciousness there ought to be sober acceptance, as a whole, however long it takes, of both what we are and what we are not,” said publisher Brian Kasoro. “It follows that it may be a good thing to cap an era of rhetorical confusion.”

The Last Generation of Black People is 138 compact and perfect-bound pages with a matte full-color finish, adorned with commissioned double-cover artwork, reprinted on limited edition t-shirts.

Submissions: scripts at liberatormagazine.com

Live From Planet Earth is a hands-on, cooperative meditation — on self-sustaining, tropical, organic human being and development — rooting and producing through your generous, reparative, faithful contributions. Please support by helping us fill this measure little by little, slowly but surely: Annual ($36), ($2400), ($6000); Monthly ($3), ($5), ($10), ($25), ($30), ($40), ($60), ($70), ($80), ($90), ($130), ($200), ($500), ($1000).

the way of the janitor / what is a janitor?



exclusive feature
Brian Hughes Kasoro
{Minneapolis, MN:USA}
The Liberator Magazine 1.1 #1, 2002

(Publisher's Commentary: I wrote this 18 years ago under the pseudonym Carl Slater, from the book Black Empire. If anything else has changed, I hope Black 17-year-old kids & their parent(s) aren't waiting until they are 18 or 19 or 30 or 60 to understand deeply, detailed & fully, the lifestyles of the Hapi rivers & Bantu lakes peoples. It will probably take an entire journey through every major school of thought in Black- African-Studies unless your mother or family storyteller's memory is from central Africa; still difficult to do today before undergraduate but probably, ultimately necessary in order to see change grow. We can't overstand the shackles of Whiteness, Racism, or Imperialism until we deeply, detailed & fully respect the scientifically original humanity's humane being--the quicker the better. Both logic's & instinct's full maturities require this full understanding of human life. The fewer life choices made before fulfulling that understanding, the more likely your chances of fully living from planet Earth. We can take our time with everything else. Open the closet and lay all the relevant tools out; as soon as possible, not at your earliest convenience. If Kanye's rural permaculture corporate commune brand is the new Ralph Lauren, Nader, or Jill Stein, then we'll know once & for all that the first republic, even with its amendments, will probably die over being reformed. Yet, both death & reform require life, so remaining the same classic, despite everchanging superficial remixes, is the need to keep it one hunnit at all times; always sooner than later. You are the master, the temple, the broom; you live, you're nature. Nobody, but your mama--creator, creati(on/ve) partner(s)--will help you live from planet earth, so if s/he (they) didn't tell you to do so yet then this here is probably one of your only chances. Liberation is not reactionary, it's regenerated outward from "cleansed" soil. Join us.)

Janitor: a noun. The word is used to describe one who is dedicated to maintenance and cleaning. Perhaps one of the lowest "animals" of the corporate American "food chain," the janitor must be humble. I've never once seen an arrogant janitor, mostly due to the fact that cleaning the trash and filth others produce is far from something to boast about. But what if there were janitors whose occupation did not consist of mopping the floors of Corporate America. Perhaps we could think outside of the boxes that we often create in order to comprehend things, and see the janitors who are instead mopping the mental and spiritual filth from the minds of our brethren.

The root of the word janitor--"Janus"--is Latin based, and is defined as one who is a "gatekeeper" or a "doorkeeper." More precisely, one who is employed to guard an entrance or a doorway leading to something or somewhere. Our word for the first month of the year is directly connected to this Latin root. The word January comes from, and is related to the Latin root as being our "gatekeeper" for each new year. It serves as the doorman of every following month; guiding each of them into the up-and-coming year.

Often when we think of, pray for, and wait in expectation for our "savior" or for someone to lead us, we envision him (her/them) as one who will come in a blaze of fire, crowned and dressed the part of a "true" leader. But just as Jews doubted the arrival of Jesus, and Christians have doubted the arrival of Mohammed, the world will have trouble accepting the arrival of a new janitorial-like leadership. If indeed "the first shall be last and the last shall be first," then who better to lead the people into the "gateway" than a bunch of "janitors?" The hero(es) we are looking for will most likely not come in the "blaze" we expect them to come in, nor will they come boasting their arrival. Leaders do not declare themselves leaders; they are declared by the will of the people. We must keep in mind that our new leadership may come as "janitors;" dirty, underpaid, and by no means crowned or dressed to play the role of one who saves. However, perhaps it is the unavoidable destiny of the people, for them not to recognize the coming of true leaders.

Many of us have been conditioned to accept only the images we have been given as reality, limiting our imaginations and the boundaries of our minds so that we cannot even fathom changes to our societal "norms." We must be careful not to deny that which we wish for. We cry for summer, then complain about the heat. We get cooler weather, then cry for the heat of summer.

What we wish for, are incorruptible, fearless leaders, who love the people more than they love themselves and are willing to sacrifice their lives for us. We cannot be foolish enough to persecute them when God sends them. We will continue to hope and pray for leaders who are employed only by God, who are attempting to live righteously and follow God's laws, and who are committed to being true servants of the people. We want leaders dedicated to cleaning up the community and helping the people find the (gate)way to the most positive--therefore we must not be surprised when our "janitors" arrive.

In these days of uncertainty, one of the only things absolutely certain is change; it is inevitable. A new leadership will have to come, because torches are not meant to be placed on mantles, they are meant to be passed down. Quite often an individual will find that which he needs in the most unlikely of places. The janitor's closet is the "last" place we look to find our future leaders--perhaps we could take some divine advice and make it the "first."

Submissions: scripts at liberatormagazine.com

Live From Planet Earth is a hands-on, cooperative meditation — on self-sustaining, tropical, organic human being and development — rooting and producing through your generous, reparative, faithful contributions. Please support by helping us fill this measure little by little, slowly but surely: Annual ($36), ($2400), ($6000); Monthly ($3), ($5), ($10), ($25), ($30), ($40), ($60), ($70), ($80), ($90), ($130), ($200), ($500), ($1000).



the pyramid people v. the people of the sphere & circle



Excerpt from Ayi Kwei Armah's, KMT: In the House of Life. Chapter four: The Way to Yarw:

● ● ●

/ / / "According to the court traditionalists, our people knew days of great glory thousands of years ago, when there were kings of godlike power. They still dream of calling back those ancient days of so-called glory."

"What do the traditionalists here in Yarw have to say about the dream of ancient glory?" I asked Astw.

"Sweet food for rotten spirits," she said, "that's what we call the glory of kings, the pride of nobles. The people at the court pretend they don't see that to be a king you must have people under you. Some see it but don't care, as long as they themselves are close to royalty. In this town we call such people the pyramid people."

"Why?"

"They look at the pyramid and admire it, seeing it as a symbol of power that at some time was ours. They ignore the real meaning of the pyramid: the huge injustice, the lack of balance. Balance is the main measure by which we in this town judge what we do. Pyramids are part of our history, but in Yarw we're not people of the pyramid. We remember something better, a symbol holding greater hope."

"A better symbol than the pyramid?"

"The sphere, the circle. The static symmetry of the pyramid oppresses the great world underneath. The sphere is a natural sign of balance. It moves, and no part of it is set up over any other part. It's about balance, movement, change. Can't you see the beauty of the sign?"

"How long have people here preferred the sphere to the pyramid?"

"Legend says we came here already loving the sphere, knowing the ravages of the pyramid. Our people, those who stayed in the great centers and those who chose to come to Yarw, came here together with the first great migration, traveling from the parent of rivers to the sea here. The pyramid people saw the Joliba and said its behavior reminded them of the other great river they know. They thought it was a sign that they could call back the days of royal power time had swept behind us. The few who wanted to try a different beginning, the people of the sphere and the circle, came this way."

"Was it ever clear what the different beginning might be?"

"No. Everything we know about it says it was not something ready made and definite, like a pyramid. It was a hope, an idea, something unfinished, perhaps not even really begun. A dream."

"Of what?"

"Life without the brutalities of caste, without people who know and people not allowed to know, without those who work and those unable to work. No poverty, and no massive riches. The sphere is about a world without the terrible injustices we now call natural."

"An attractive world," I said.

"Yet strangely powerless in the confrontation with this other world, this world of injustice in all its ugliness. The pyramid. Castes. The rich and the poor. The informed and the ignorant."

"Why do you think an idea so attractive has remained so powerless?"

"This is what so many conversations here are about. It often comes down to a question of speed. The good dream is too slow. What the traditionalists in this town want is to turn knowledge into the property of everyone, like air. But everyone sees it would take ages to bring about such an outcome. Meanwhile, the nightmare life is faster, and easier. So we live it. Intimately, many of us are too numb even to wonder if something else might be possible. Think of this as a riddle: the training of expert traditionalists always ends with an oath. The new master of knowledge must swear never to reveal what he knows to the people, only to other initiates. So those responsible for knowledge in this society swear to keep it hidden from the people, and make it a plaything for nobles."

"Did Hor also take the oath of secrecy?"

"All trained traditionalists take it. Hor is not simply trained. He's a master at this work, a teacher of masters. Yes, he took the oath."

"And, having taken it, stopped asking questions?"

"That might have made life simpler. But Hor couldn't stop asking questions. The man has never been able to stop thinking and asking questions that matter to him. Most of his adult life, the oath stood confronting him as an injustice too great to do anything about. Yet somewhere in his being he never gave up looking for a way to defeat the oath. From the time I first saw him, I knew here was a man obsessed with the search for a solution to the riddle of the traditionalists' oath. What happens when the keepers of knowledge are under oath not to share it? Imagine the keepers of granaries filled with food, forbidden in times of chronic famine to distribute it except to a chosen few. What happens to human beings placed under the absurd supposition that some are chosen, other damned? What happens to the society thus deprived of knowledge -- knowledge of self first, then knowledge of the real nature of the world? Part of the reason Hor and I found each other is that he has always been struggling to find answers to these questions."

"You share the obsession?"

"Let's say it lives at the center of my life. When Hor and I met, he was preparing himself for a lonely life, with no one to talk to about his deepest dreams. Then he heard me asking why women had been pushed out of the work of traditionalists, when it happened, how it happened. He told me he had been thinking those thoughts for years, not knowing he'd find anyone to share them with."

"Did he say, though, that he really hoped to find answers to the riddle of the traditionalists' oath of secrecy?"

"Yes."

Submissions: scripts at liberatormagazine.com

Live From Planet Earth is a hands-on, cooperative meditation — on self-sustaining, tropical, organic human being and development — rooting and producing through your generous, reparative, faithful contributions. Please support by helping us fill this measure little by little, slowly but surely: Biennial ($2400); Annual ($36), ($2400), ($6000); Monthly ($3), ($5), ($10), ($25), ($30), ($40), ($60), ($70), ($80), ($90), ($130), ($200), ($500), ($1000).



"the ultimate goal of farming is not the growing of crops, but the cultivation and perfection of human beings" / masanobu fukuoka on do nothing farming



In the pursuit of Knowledge,
every day something is added.
In the practice of the Way,
every day something is dropped.

Less and less do you need to force things,
until finally you arrive at non-action.
When nothing is done,
nothing is left undone.

— Lao Tzu

Masanobu Fukuoka is a master gardener known as the father of "Natural Farming" or "Do Nothing Farming." Fukuoka, who passed away in 2008, lived on a small farm on the southern Japanese island of Shikoku. After having something of a revelation about the nature of human existence, he left his job as a microbiologist and returned home to work his father’s farm. He had been utilizing certain 'natural' farming methods since the 1940s, long before mainstream society’s inclination toward ‘organic’ or ‘natural’ food and lifestyle alternatives. His methods are fascinating not only because they go against most common practices of modern large scale agricultural operations, but also because he draws very critical linkages between nature, spirit and human activity. For many, these methods are not earth shattering, but rather an affirmation of the types of practices that have been successfully occurring and sustaining communities for years prior to the industrial age.

For Fukuoka, he employs 4 main methods (no tilling, no chemical fertilizer or prepared compost, no weeding and no pesticides) that are meant to allow the land to return to its original biological balance prior to massive human intervention. They are outlined in his book One Straw Revolution. Through these methods he has managed to minimize pollution, while still reaping similar yields as his neighbors using more 'modern' methods.

His methods are similar to what we at Live From Planet Earth refer to as permaculture, no-dig, or, a similar cousin, integrated farming, which is an important aspect of the methods found at the Songhai Centre in Benin, West Africa. The idea of reaching for a natural balance and wholeness outside of industrially-formed intuitions is an important proposition.



A talk with Masanobu Fukuoka (1982)

Masanobu Fukuoka, with his grizzled white beard, subdued voice, and traditional Oriental working clothes, may not seem like an apt prototype of a successful innovative farmer. Nor does it, at first glance, appear possible that his rice fields—riotous jungles of tangled weeds, clover, and grain—are among the most productive pieces of land in Japan. But that's all part of the paradox that surrounds this man and his method of natural farming.

On a mountain overlooking Matsuyama Bay on the southern Japanese island of Shikoku, Fukuoka-san (son is the traditional Japanese form of respectful address) has—since the end of World War II—raised rice, winter grain, and citrus crops . . . using practices that some people might consider backward (or even foolish!). Yet his acres consistently produce harvests that equal or surpass those of his neighbors who use labor-intensive, chemical-dependent methods. Fukuoka's system of farming is amazing not only for its yields, but also for the fact that he has not plowed his fields for more than 30 years! Nor does he use prepared fertilizer—not even compost—on his land, or weed his rows, or flood his rice paddies.

Through painstaking experimentation, you see, this Japanese grower has come up with a method of agriculture that reflects the deep affinity he feels with nature. He believes that by expanding our intellect beyond the traditional confines of scientific knowledge—and by trusting the inherent wisdom of life processes—we can learn all we need to know about growing food crops. A farmer, he says, should carefully watch the cycles of nature and then work with those patterns, rather than try to conquer and "tame" them.

In keeping with that philosophy, Fukuoka-san's fields display the diversity and plant succession that is a natural part of any ecosystem. In the spring, he sows rice amidst his winter grain . . . then, late in the year, casts grain seed among the maturing rice plants. A ground cover of clover and straw underlies the crops, deterring weeds and enriching the soil. In addition, the master gardener grows vegetables "wild" beneath the unpruned trees in his mountainside orchard. Naturally, such unconventional plots might look positively disastrous to traditional agronomists, but as Fukuoka points out to skeptical visitors, "The proof of my techniques is ripening right before your eyes!"

For many years, the Oriental gentleman's unique ideas were known only to a few individuals in his own country. In 1975, however, he wrote a book entitled The One-Straw Revolution, which was later published in the United States. Since then, he has been in great demand by groups eager to know more about this strange "new" attitude toward farming. In 1979 Fukuoka-san undertook an extensive tour of the United States . . . and while he was in Amherst, Massachusetts for a series of university lectures, he talked for several hours with Larry Korn, a student of natural farming methods and the editor of The One-Straw Revolution. Their conversation was conducted entirely in Japanese and later translated into the edited version printed here.

Incidentally, if you're puzzled by several instances of apparent contradiction in the following comments, consider that Fukuoka-like the Oriental philosophers who deliberately present students with what seem to be illogical statements or paradoxes—is perhaps trying to help people break habitual patterns of thought and develop new perceptions. And because his natural farming does demand such an unaccustomed mode of thinking, Fukuoka-san warns that it is not for the timid or the lazy: "My method completely contradicts modern agricultural techniques. It throws scientific knowledge and traditional farming know-how right out the window." What's left in the wake of that revolutionary (and sometimes admittedly befuddling) upheaval, however, should excite—and challenge—anyone who'd like to see a simpler, more natural form a of agriculture take root.

PLOWBOY: Then successful natural farming is not simply a do-nothing technique?

FUKUOKA: No, it actually involves a process of bringing your mind as closely in line as possible with the natural functioning of the environment. However, you have to be careful: This method does not mean that we should suddenly throw away all the scientific knowledge about horticulture that we already have. That course of action is simply abandonment, because it ignores the cycle of dependence that humans have imposed upon an altered ecosystem. If a farmer does abandon his or her "tame" fields completely to nature, mistakes and destruction are inevitable. The real path to natural farming requires that a person know what unaltered nature is, so that he or she can instinctively understand what needs to be done—and what must not be done—to work in harmony with its processes.

PLOWBOY: For folks who may be unfamiliar with your book, The One-Straw Revolution, let's review the basic practices you follow in your natural system of growing grain, vegetables, and citrus.

FUKUOKA: First of all, I operate under four firm principles. The first is NO TILLING . . . that is, no turning or plowing of the soil. Instead, I let the earth cultivate itself by means of the penetration of plant roots and the digging activity of micro-organisms, earthworms, and small animals.

The second rule is NO CHEMICAL FERTILIZER OR PREPARED COMPOST. I've found that you can actually drain the soil of essential nutrients by careless use of such dressings! Left alone, the earth maintains its own fertility, in accordance with the orderly cycle of plant and animal life.

The third guideline I follow is NO WEEDING, either by cultivation or by herbicides. Weeds play an important part in building soil fertility and in balancing the biological community . . . so I make it a practice to control—rather than eliminate—the weeds in my fields. Straw mulch, a ground cover of white clover interplanted with the crops, and temporary flooding all provide effective weed control in my fields.

The final principle of natural farming is NO PESTICIDES. As I've emphasized before, nature is in perfect balance when left alone. Of course, harmful insects and diseases are always present, but normally not to such an extent that poisonous chemicals are required to correct the situation. The only sensible approach to disease and insect control, I think, is to grow sturdy crops in a healthy environment.

As far as my planting program goes, I simply broadcast rye and barley seed on separate fields in the fall . . . while the rice in those areas is still standing. A few weeks after that I harvest the rice, and then spread its straw back over the fields as mulch. The two winter grains are usually cut about the 20th of May . . . but two weeks or so before those crops have fully matured, I broadcast rice seed right over them. After the rye and barley have been harvested and threshed, I spread their straw back over the field to protect the rice seedlings. I also grow white clover and weeds in these same fields. The legume is sown among the rice plants in early fall. And the weeds I don't have to worry about . . . they reseed themselves quite easily!

In a 1-1/4-acre field like mine, one or two people can do all the work of growing rice and winter grain in a matter of a few days, without keeping the field flooded all season . . . without using compost, fertilizer, herbicides, or other chemicals . . . and without plowing one inch of the field! It seems unlikely to me that there could be a simpler way of raising grain.

As for citrus, I grow several varieties on the hillsides near my home. As I told you, I started natural farming after the war with just one small plot, but gradually I acquired additional acreage by taking over surrounding pieces of abandoned land and caring for them by hand. First, I had to recondition that red clay soil by planting clover as a ground cover and allowing the weeds to return. I also introduced a few hardy vegetables—such as the Japanese daikon radish—and allowed the natural predators to take care of insect pests. As a result of that thick weed/clover cover, the surface layer of the orchard soil has becomeover the past 30 years-loose, darkcolored, and rich with earthworms and organic matter. In my orchard there are now pines and cedar trees, a few pear trees, persimmons, loquats, Japanese cherries, and many other native varieties growing among the citrus trees. I also have the nitrogen-fixing acacia, which helps to enrich the soil deep in the ground. So by raising tall trees for windbreaks, citrus underneath, and a green manure cover down on the surface, I have found a way to take it easy and let the orchard manage itself!

PLOWBOY: Have you encountered any really serious problems with disease or insect pests over the decades that you've been practicing natural farming?

FUKUOKA: Since I turned the fields back to their natural state, I can't say I've had any really difficult problems with insects or disease. Even when it looked as if something had gone wrong and the crops would soon be devastated, nature always seemed to bail me out in the end!

Of course, I have made mistakes . . . just as every grower does. However, I never really think of them as mistakes! Back in the beginning, for example, when 70% of a field was overgrown and unproductive and 20 to 30% was extremely productive, I saw my limited harvest as a success. I figured that if a small percentage of the field did produce, I could eventually make the rest of the acreage do just as well. My neighbors would never have been satisfied with a field like that . . . but I just viewed the "mistake" as a hint or a lesson. One of the most important discoveries I made in those early years was that to succeed at natural farming, you have to get rid of your expectations. Such "products" of the mind are often incorrect or unrealistic . . . and can lead you to think you've made a mistake if they're not met.

PLOWBOY: Some people have noticed a spiritual, almost mystical quality to your theory of farming. Do you feel you're receiving insight and guidance from a divine source?

FUKUOKA: Although natural farming—since it can teach people to cultivate a deep understanding of nature—may lead to spiritual insight, it's not strictly a spiritual practice. Natural farming is just farming, nothing more. You don't have to be a spiritually oriented person to practice my methods. Anyone who can approach these concepts with a clear, open mind will be starting off well. In fact, the person who can most easily take up natural agriculture is the one who doesn't have any of the common adult obstructing blocks of desire, philosophy, or religion . . . the person who has the mind and heart of a child. One must simply know nature . . . real nature, not the one we think we know!

PLOWBOY: Can you be more specific about what that attitude should be?

FUKUOKA: Many people think that, when we practice agriculture, nature is helping us in our efforts to grow food. That is an exclusively human-centered viewpoint . . . we should, instead, realize that we are receiving that which nature decides to give us. A farmer does not grow something in the sense that he or she creates it. That human is only a small part of the whole process by which nature expresses its being. The farmer has very little influence over that process . . . other than being there and doing his or her small part.

People should relate to nature as birds do. Birds don't run around carefully preparing fields, planting seeds, and harvesting food. They don't create anything . . . they just receive what is there for them with a humble and grateful heart. We, too, receive our nourishment from the Mother Earth. So we should put our hands together in an attitude of prayer and say "please" and "thank you" when dealing with nature. (full interview / source)

Originally Posted 05/06/2011

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Live From Planet Earth is a hands-on, cooperative meditation — on self-sustaining, tropical, organic human being and development — rooting and producing through your generous, reparative, faithful contributions. Please support by helping us fill this measure little by little, slowly but surely: Annual ($36), ($2400), ($6000); Monthly ($3), ($5), ($10), ($25), ($30), ($40), ($60), ($70), ($80), ($90), ($130), ($200), ($500), ($1000).



kale in kenya



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ancient medicine



Maharishi Ayurveda Foundation
The Liberator Magazine 2.1 #3 2003, 3.1 #5 2004, 3.3 #7 2004

Your First Visit to a Vaidya

What to expect: Ayurvedic physicians (vaidyas) follow a healing tradition that dates back thousands of years—5,000 years at the very least. Their textbooks are written in Sanskrit, and the body of knowledge that the enlightened sages of those ancient times left behind is truly astounding in its depth and volume. What this means, in modern times, is that a vaidya is required to be more than a healer—(s)he needs to be a good communicator. This also means that your first visit to a vaidya is going to be an experience with a difference.

What is a vaidya: A person earns the title of vaidya when he has, through training, acquired a deep Ayurvedic knowledge about the physical, mental, and emotional aspects of healing (veda = knowledge). This is because in Ayurveda, disease is not treated on just the physical level—it is always seen in the context of a person's overall personality and circumstances—which includes factors like profession, family life, seasonal influences, and daily habits. Therefore, vaidyas study the whole field of life, individual and cosmic, not just the field of medicine. Because they look for personal unique causes of imbalance, vaidyas do not imply conventional diagnostic tools like the blood-pressure instrument, thermometer, etc. They hold your wrist and take your pulse, for it is the wave of your pulse that is their most reliable source of information about your individual physiology and balance needs.

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healing yoga poses for most common pains & opening energy chakras



Whether or not you are a regular practitioner of Yoga, knowing basic flexibility & meditative poses is a must as a human with an aging body. It is simply unhealthy to avoid intimate stretching and deep breathing daily. As a runner, I was taught and have fallen in love with a few poses for my back and knees that I swear by today. Moreover, practices of the body that teach or remind the mind of sensitivity and healing processes (mind-body) make us better humans.

These visual cards below will help you memorize some of the most common basic poses. As you learn more poses, this sort of symbolic visual modeling will become more and more useful. Don't forget to breathe into the stomach first, up through the lungs, exhale the lungs all the way through, then deeply deflate the stomach, and repeat. For detailed instructions, visit the Pain Management and Injury Relief Medical Center & Health Perch.





















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Live From Planet Earth is a hands-on, cooperative meditation — on self-sustaining, tropical, organic human being and development — rooting and producing through your generous, reparative, faithful contributions. Please support by helping us fill this measure little by little, slowly but surely: Annual ($36), ($2400), ($6000); Monthly ($3), ($5), ($10), ($25), ($30), ($40), ($60), ($70), ($80), ($90), ($130), ($200), ($500), ($1000).




vol. 1 & a playlist



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/livefromplanetearth


Live From Planet Earth Volume 1 (download)

Live From Planet Earth is a hands-on, cooperative meditation — on self-sustaining, tropical, organic human being and development — rooting and producing through your generous, reparative, faithful contributions. Please support by helping us fill this measure little by little, slowly but surely: Annual ($36), ($2400), ($6000); Monthly ($3), ($5), ($10), ($25), ($30), ($40), ($60), ($70), ($80), ($90), ($130), ($200), ($500), ($1000).




previous releases



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Live From Planet Earth is a hands-on, cooperative meditation — on self-sustaining, tropical, organic human being and development — rooting and producing through your generous, reparative, faithful contributions. Please support by helping us fill this measure little by little, slowly but surely: Annual ($36), ($2400), ($6000); Monthly ($3), ($5), ($10), ($25), ($30), ($40), ($60), ($70), ($80), ($90), ($130), ($200), ($500), ($1000).